“The Next Generation Of Diabetic’s-Why Is It An Epidemic”[Case Study]

(CASE STUDY)-“The Next Generation Of Diabetic’s- Why Has Is It An Epidemic”.So far we have discussed how to be free from diabetes. The effects of neuropathy and if they can be removed. We also looked into Diabetes with dogs and cats. We also looked at how it is handled with treatment from Veterinarians. Our final article was about what types of exercises are good to use for people with diabetes. It also featured the types of exercises that are best suited for diabetics. There is so much good information available that there should not be a shortage at all.

This article will be our first case study that we will investigate about childhood diabetes. Some of these things we will dive into in this article are:

Fat Kids

  • Why has diabetes got out of control in our kids.
  • Could this disease be the downfall of our society.
  • Should obese children have weight loss surgery and is it safe for all ages.
  • Are children decreasing there life span from obesity.
  • Who is really to blame about this condition? Parents, kids, or society?

Why Has Diabetes Got Out Of Control In Our Kids:

I believe that there are several factors to the answer to this question. Children now a days are less active then they were 20 years ago. More time is spent playing on the computer or with video games. The majority of children now days stay indoors and don’t spend nearly as much time as the generation before them. Most families usually the husband and the wife both work full time jobs to make ends meet, As a result of this children are home alone, most days after school and tend to make there own choices with what to do and what to eat.

I have found a in depth study on childhood diabetes I want to share with you on this matter. I hope you find it very informative.

Should Obese Children Have Weight Loss Surgery And Is It Safe:

That is a great question to look into. Weightloss from brickbat surgery has been shown to improve several such risk factors in adults; however, for children and adolescents these effects would take many years to measure, and studies are still ongoing. to me that sounds like a mixed answer. In my opinion you might be using your child as a guinea pig. I would really like to have a bit more results before moving forward.

When a child is first examined by his or her pediatrician or primary care doctor, you can expect a thorough evaluation detailing the child’s food intake, physical activity level, blood work and more. Once you, your child and their healthcare professional have gathered this information, you can then begin to discuss treatment options.Another very important part of good nutrition is taking multi vitamins and such for good health. CLICK THE BANNER FROM TRVitamins and pick up some today. Excellent prices and excellent selection.

TNVitamins | Savings Starting At 20% On Vitamins & Supplements | Save Now

While treatments such as behavioral and lifestyle modifications may work for the majority of children affected by obesity and help them increase their health, there are children affected by severe obesity that require more aggressive treatment such as bariatric surgery.

Obesity

Bariatric surgery, which is commonly performed on adults affected by severe obesity, has been shown to produce long-lasting weight-loss and improvement in many obesity-related conditions such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, sleep apnea and more.

Currently, the most common operations being performed in children affected by severe obesity are the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) and vertical sleeve gastrectomy.

The goal of bariatric surgery is to provide the most benefit possible with the lowest risk. With this in mind, many research studies have been done to evaluate outcomes following bariatric surgery in adolescents, and many more are ongoing. The information and recommendations contained here are based on a recent review of the available medical literature and extensive discussion by a panel of experts on childhood obesity and bariatric surgery.

Who Should Be Considered For Bariatric Surgery:

In general, the more severe obesity is, the higher the risk for co-morbidities. The BMI (body mass index) is an index of weight for height that is commonly used in the medical profession to classify underweight, overweight, obesity and severe obesity in adults. BMI is typically used a little differently for children, but most surgeons use BMI thresholds while trying to determine if an adolescent is a candidate for weight-loss surgery.

In addition to BMI, physicians consider co-morbidities and the potential long-term health risks associated with untreated obesity when determining a patient’s appropriateness for bariatric surgery.

weight loss surgery

Recommended selection criteria for adolescents being considered for a bariatric procedure include:

  1. BMI 35 kg/m2 or higher with major co-morbidities (such as type 2 diabetes, moderate or severe sleep apnea, pseudotumor cerebri, or severe fatty liver disease)
  2. BMI 40 kg/m2 or higher with other less severe co-morbidities (such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, mild or moderate sleep apnea)

Despite the above minimum BMI criteria, many insurance companies will not cover bariatric surgical procedures for adolescents under the age of 18 years, or they may have different criteria or only cover a certain specific procedure or procedures. If you are considering bariatric surgery for your child, it would be helpful to contact your insurance company to see if these procedures are covered under your plan. If you are looking for a custom food plan. Go click the link ad from Bistro Md. They have all types of food plans structured to your needs.

300x600 Pick Your Meals NOW

Obesity Related health Problems:

TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS (T2DM):

Compared with Type 1 (or juvenile) diabetes, T2DM usually develops later in life, and is associated with overweight and obesity. Some children and adolescents affected by obesity develop T2DM early. This is a long-standing disease that tends to worsen throughout time, and diabetic children are at increased risk of developing high blood pressure, high cholesterol and liver disease. Recent data suggests that adolescents who undergo bariatric surgery can have significant improvement or complete remission of their T2DM.

OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA :

Up to 22 percent of children and adolescents affected by obesity have obstructive sleep apnea, which is characterized by shallow breathing or abnormal pauses in breathing during sleep. Sleep apnea can cause fatigue, moodiness and difficulties with paying attention and completing tasks. In many patients, obstructive sleep apnea has been shown to improve or go away after bariatric surgery.

NON-ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE AND NON-ALCOHOLIC STEATOHEPATITIS :

Approximately 38 percent of children and adolescents affected by obesity have fatty deposition in their livers, compared with 5 percent of normal-weight individuals, and about 9 percent have associated inflammation (called steatohepatitis), compared with 1 percent of lean children. Studies have shown that such fatty deposition and inflammation may lead to fibrosis, or scarring in the liver. This has been shown to improve in adolescents who have undergone bariatric surgery.

PSEUDOTUMOR CEREBRI :

Pseudotumor cerebri is a condition caused by increased pressure inside the skull, and symptoms can include headache, visual changes, ringing in the ears, nausea and vomiting.  There is often no obvious cause for this condition, but it has been associated with obesity and symptoms frequently improve several months after bariatric surgery.

Obesity

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE :

Although we are still learning about risk factors for heart disease in children affected by obesity, research suggests that childhood obesity may lead to increased risk of heart and vascular diseases in adulthood. Weight-loss from bariatric surgery has been shown to improve several such risk factors in adults; however, for children and adolescents these effects would take many years to measure, and studies are still ongoing.

QUALITY OF LIFE :

Many children and adolescents affected by obesity feel that their obesity and health issues have a negative impact on their quality of life and emotional health, and several studies have shown significant improvement after weight-loss.

DEPRESSION :

Adolescents affected by obesity often find themselves affected by depression as well. Adolescents who undergo weight-loss surgery often see improvement in their emotional wellbeing. Conversely, weight-loss studies suggest that adult patients seem to be at slightly increased risk for suicide after bariatric surgery. We recommend that adolescents with depression before surgery be watched closely for signs of depression after surgery.

EATING DISORDERS :

Binge eating and purging (sometimes called bulimia) has been seen in some adolescents with obesity who desire bariatric surgery. Eating disturbances are quite serious, and outcomes following bariatric surgery in teens with eating disorders have not been studied. Because of this, bariatric surgery in these adolescents is generally discouraged unless the eating disturbance has been appropriately treated and is well-controlled.

Who Should Be Considered for Bariatric Surgery?

In general, the more severe obesity is, the higher the risk for co-morbidities. The BMI (body mass index) is an index of weight for height that is commonly used in the medical profession to classify underweight, overweight, obesity and severe obesity in adults. BMI is typically used a little differently for children, but most surgeons use BMI thresholds while trying to determine if an adolescent is a candidate for weight-loss surgery.

Recommended selection criteria for adolescents being considered for a bariatric procedure include:

In addition to BMI, physicians consider co-morbidities and the potential long-term health risks associated with untreated obesity when determining a patient’s appropriateness for bariatric surgery.

  1. BMI 35 kg/m2 or higher with major co-morbidities (such as type 2 diabetes, moderate or severe sleep apnea, pseudotumor cerebri, or severe fatty liver disease)
  2. BMI 40 kg/m2 or higher with other less severe co-morbidities (such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, mild or moderate sleep apnea)

Despite the above minimum BMI criteria, many insurance companies will not cover bariatric surgical procedures for adolescents under the age of 18 years, or they may have different criteria or only cover a certain specific procedure or procedures. If you are considering bariatric surgery for your child, it would be helpful to contact your insurance company to see if these procedures are covered under your plan.I have also included a different type of food plan you should consider when dealing with obesity in children. click the highlighted link and get your own food plan going today.They will also give you the FIRST 14 DAYS TO TRY IT FREE !

Lack Of Physical Activity And Poor Diet:

When our children are left to make there own decisions. Obesity is sometimes the end result. The last portion of this article we dove in to the pros and cons of weight loss surgery. I feel we gave the reader more then enough great content on that subject. Now we will do our best to give you more regarding poor nutrition and lack of physical activity.


Poor diet and lack of exercise can lead to a plethora of physical and mental health problems. These two factors are the primary contributors to obesity, linked with an increased risk for many diseases. As of 2009, 49 states reported an obesity rate of at least 20 percent, with nine of those states reporting an obesity rate of 30 percent or more. The Centers for Disease Control reports obesity in America has increased dramatically since 1985.

Causes of poor nutrition include eating disorders, alcoholism, starvation and poor diet. Short-term effects of poor nutrition include lethargy and feeling unwell in general. The National Institute of Health links long-term poor nutrition with a number of physical issues. These include obesity, high cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, gallstones, gout and many other health problems.

Vitamin and mineral deficiencies resulting from a bad diet link with disorders of the nervous system. Malnutrition in infants can lead to mental retardation and other developmental delays, and malnutrition in pregnancy may even increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease when the child reaches old age. Poor diet may also contribute to depression.

food

Inadequate exercise can have a long-term negative effect on personal appearance as well. A study by the University of St. Andrews reports a lack of exercise exacerbates the visible signs of aging, making people’s faces look older and fatter.

A 2004 study concluded that lack of exercise was the leading cause of obesity among adolescents. Obese teens were more likely to have a sedentary lifestyle, choosing television, video games and computer activities over physical activities. A sedentary lifestyle increases the risk for heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, certain cancers, stroke, sleep apnea, osteoarthritis and infertility.

The CDC reports that as of 2006, more than 15 percent of Americans suffer depression and more than 11 percent have anxiety disorders. Arizona State University researchers report a direct correlation between exercise and mental health; specifically, exercise reduces symptoms of depression and anxiety. The antidepressant effects of exercise increased with duration and intensity.

A study reported in the Journal of Health Psychology showed participants in a 10-week study had significant cognitive and psychological improvement due to exercise. These benefits disappeared when participants stopped the exercise program.

Parents Role In Helping Your Child Prevent Obesity:

In the United States, childhood obesity is a big concern — and it’s growing bigger.

Children are at a greater risk of being obese than ever before. A recent study found that lack of exercise, fast food, and number of hours spent watching television are all factors contributing to the epidemic.

However, Dr. Joseph Galati, author of Eating Yourself Sick: How to Stop Obesity, Fatty Liver, and Diabetes from Killing You and Your Family,” suggests another element is partially to blame: parents.

The root problem, he says is that parents aren’t paying enough attention to what they feed their kids. Families aren’t eating enough home-cooked meals and parents aren’t serving healthy snacks.

Galati, a liver specialist in Houston, says parents need to step up and take responsibly. He also urges doctors to be more forceful with their assessments.

“Most physicians do not have the spine to tell the entire family, you’re all in trouble, you’re all going to die early,” he says.ADVERTISING

Galati may have a point. But the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) counsels a gentler approach.

“Obesity is a medical diagnosis with real health consequences, so it is important for children and families to understand the current and future health risks,” a 2017 policy statement notes “But the information should be given in a sensitive and supportive manner.”

“Guilt and blame don’t motivate long-term healthy changes, they just make people feel bad,” Texas pediatrician Stephen Pont, co-author of the AAP statement, says. He encourages children and families to make small changes as a family that stick and “keep it positive.”

It’s a way of life

Obesity is a risk factor of the current American lifestyle and that’s heavily reflected in the habits of our children.

American kids are less likely to bike or walk to school than ever before.

From ages 8 to 18, they also spend an average of 7.5 hours a day are wrapped up in TV, computers, video games, cell phones, and movies. During those hours they tend to snack as well.

About 1 in 5 American children/teens cope with obesity, compared to about a third of adults.

Recently, obesity rates among young children seemed to be dropping, but a study in the journal Pediatrics in March, using 2016 data, reported that this wasn’t true.

In fact, severe obesity among children ages 2 to 5 has jumped since 2013.Among 16 to 19 year old 41.5 percent live with obesity. More than 4 percent fall into the heaviest group, “class III.”

food binge

Some parents dismiss plumpness as “baby fat,” but kids tend not to shrink. In a study of almost 4,000 public school students, nearly all 10th-graders with obesity were above normal weight in 5th grade.

Instead, experts advise a more realistic approach. They suggest concerned parents use tools such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s calculator, which includes healthy standards for different ages and heights, to assess their child’s risk.

Frank Biro at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center offers this rule of thumb: if after the age of 1 a girl’s waist is more than 60 percent of her height, both measured in inches, she’s “at risk of having the metabolic complications of overweight.”

Recent research shows childhood obesity may become an even bigger health concern in the future.

According to projections in a 2017 study, close to 60 percent of today’s American children could be living with obesity by the time they’re 35.

childhood obesity

The risk to your child’s health

As a liver specialist, Galati tends to see adults with obesity who have been diagnosed with fatty liver disease. When those patients tell him they have children, he starts asking questions. Often, he finds that the kids of those patients are also heading into obese territory. That’s when Galati warns them that their kids are likely to die sooner than they would if they lost weight.

Muchnevidence backs up Galati’s claim that childhood obesity can shorten a person’s life, upping their chances of heart disease, stroke, liver disease, and cancer.

Modern medicine and a growing economy pushed U.S. life expectancy up rapidly for more than a century, but that increase began to slow when more Americans became overweight.

Research shows U.S. life expectancy at birth has actually dropped in the last two years.

The problem is worse in areas of the South and Midwest where more people are obese, notes, David Ludwig, an endocrinologist and obesity specialist at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Ludwig, who is also author of the cookbook “Always Delicious” argues  that the “downward trend in longevity will almost certainly accelerate as the current generation of children — with higher body weights from earlier in life than ever before — reaches adulthood.”

Health problems we associate with middle age are showing up earlier. Galati has begun to see teenagers complaining of fatigue and nausea. Then their bloodwork shows they have a fatty liver.

Up to 40 percent of obese children have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NALD), which can progress to cirrhosis of the liver.

One group’s clinical guidelines recommend screening obese children for NALD between ages 9 and 11, and screening overweight children with prediabetes, a big belly, or sleep apnea. NALD seems linked to the size of your waistline as much as your overall weight.

A mother’s responsibility for a child’s weight may begin as early as the womb. According to one large 2012 German study, expectant mothers who gain too much weight during pregnancy increase their child’s chances of being overweight by 28 percent before they turn 6 years old.

Starting early

Minimizing antibiotics for babies and toddlers may help.Evidence in mice and children under 2 suggests that antibiotics can alter gut bacteria in an unhealthy way.

childhood obesity

Fighting the trends

How can you help your kids steer clear of this unhealthy trend?Family dinner is a good start, according to much research.

In a study. of 8,550 4-year- old findings showed that those who regularly ate dinner as a family — and also had limited screen-time and enough sleep — were 40 percent less likely to be obese.Children who eat with their families also have better grades, family relationships, and overall health, Galati points out.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) advocates for “screen-free” zones in children’s bedrooms, no TV during dinner, and only one or two hours a day of TV or video games.

Tapping fingers on a keyboard or jiggling a mouse doesn’t count as exercise. The CDC suggests a target of doing at least an hour of physical activity a day, most of it aerobic, and muscle and bone-strengthening activities like skipping rope, gymnastics, and push ups at least three days a week.

Look into game-oriented activity and step trackers. You might also use point systems attached to rewards. For example, if your son is active for a half hour a day four or five nights a week, he might get to pick a family movie night. “It’s ideal if the reward is not an unhealthy food,” Pont says.Stick to bedtimes and keep electronics away from bed. Fatigue leads to overeating and can prime the body for weight gain. Overweight children may need treatment for sleep apnea as well.

“When you do not sleep enough, your inflammatory markers go up, it raises blood pressure, insulin and cortisol,” Galati says.When you eat out, you might talk about how portion sizes have grown bigger than in the past. Make it a rule to share entrees or have a child eat an appetizer as their main course. Turn down the bread basket, order salads, avoid rich sauces, and share or skip dessert.

eating

But cooking food at home is the best way to control fat and sugar, Galati says. “When parents pick up the kid from an activity, they say, ‘I don’t have time to cook dinner, let’s go to the drive through, let’s go to Cheesecake Factory and take something home.’ So they’re consuming high-calorie, high-fat food three or four times a week,” Galati said. “Naysayers say to me you’re living in a fantasy world if you think parents are going to start cooking dinner again. I say, we have to get back to the basics.”

Galati argues that children like home-cooked healthful food. He recalls his mother serving soups and fruit salad to his friends growing up on Long Island. “The kids would come over looking for the cookies and chips,” but they’d love his mother’s food. “My mother would invariably get a phone call from the other kid’s mother asking for the recipe,” he said. “At her funeral, they were telling me they remembered what she made for them.”

Galati believes in teaching kids to think of food in two categories: “Earth food came from the ground or had a mother. Man food comes in a box or can.”“It’s time parents start educating themselves and their children about food and start making better choices,” Galati says. “Otherwise the consequences will be a lot direr than what most parents probably realize.”

Pont, who is medical director of the Office of Science and Population Health for the Texas Department of State Health Services, urges doctors to avoid any kind of fat-shaming. A number of studies have documented “anti-fat bias” among medical professionals.He points out that shame, guilt, and blame backfire.

A team at Johns Hopkins did a national survey of 600 higher-than-normal weight adults to test that thesis. The result: If your primary care doctor had talked to you about your weight and you felt judged, you were more likely to try to lose weight, but less likely to actually succeed. About 13.5 percent of those who felt judged in that conversation went on to lose at least 10 percent of their weight year. But among those who didn’t feel judged, a bigger group — more than 20 percent — reached that goal.

Pont, who struggled with his own weight as a boy, argues that parents should avoid judgment as well.“Parents should be emphatic and say that there’s no perfect shape or size,” he said.The goal would be to slowly make healthy changes, rather than adopt an extreme diet that won’t last.Parents can also set an example, improving their own eating habits. “If a parent does something then it is important; if a parent doesn’t do something then it means it is less important,”


Final Thoughts:

There is so much more information out there on obesity and children. I feel we thoroughly dismantled the subject. I recommend that you research more of this subject. Ask your pediatrician, friends, look up more information on the internet, etc. I want to thank you for taking the time to go through this new case study. I also encourage you to comment, like, share, and subscribe to our email list so you can stay up to date on the latest articles that we put out.